Tag Archives: community

For Humanists, It Should Be About Community

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Happy Humanist with word CommunityI previously posted about my complaints about some Humanists forming ‘churches’ or creating ‘congregations’. My concern has always been about using warmed over religious words like ‘congregation’ or having ‘services’ on a Sunday. I explained that using religious words for non-religious activities causes confusion and doesn’t explain what we Humanists are really about. So in this post I want to explain how being honest in the terms we use will actually lead more people joining us.
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Greg Epstein, Humanists Don’t Need Congregations We Need More Communities

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photo of Greg M. Epstein -Humanist Chaplain at Harvard University
Greg M. Epstein serves as the Humanist Chaplain at Harvard University

The other day a friend sent me a link to an announcement that Greg Epstein, who serves as the Humanist Chaplain at Harvard University, and James Croft, a Research and Education Fellow at the Humanist Community at Harvard, are writing a book titled “The Godless Congregation”. While it didn’t surprise me coming from Greg Epstein, the title and idea behind the book made me cringe. He and Croft plan on traveling the country to write about people who form godless churches and how “we” nones need such places. This isn’t the first time I disagreed with Epstein’s equivocations and his thinking there are no other godless communities outside his bubble.
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After Newtown, Where Were The Humanists? Just Look Harder

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?It has been a couple of weeks since the tragic mass shooting at the Sandy Hook elementary school where 26 people were murdered by a man with a gun on December 14th. No one, who is human, can not feel sad at the loss of so many children. Even if you didn’t personally know the victims or their families we all have empathy for them. Not only has the murders brought guns back to the front of the public debate but it also is being used as a litmus test for those of use who are Humanists and non-religious.
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